Special Events

Join us on March 31st and April 1st for a free two-day in-person regional XSEDE workshop hosted by Arizona State University. Open to all faculty, researchers, and students in all disciplines including Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS), interested in learning how to incorporate analytics, modeling and simulation, advanced data analysis and visualization, and high performance computing into their teaching and research. The workshop will provide an overview of computational, data analysis, visualization, and data storage resources available at ASU Advanced Computing Center (A2C2), U of A Research Computing Center and XSEDE. There will be hands-on training sessions on topics such as parallel programming, scientific visualization, and simulation and modeling tools for the classroom.

A2C2 provides transformative advanced computing solutions, in a cost-effective manner, to support the University’s mission and goals as they apply to research, education, and public service.

UA Research Computing provides HPC, HTC, Storage, Data Center Co-Location, Visualization, and Statistical consulting resources and support to the University of Arizona research community.

XSEDE is a virtual organization that provides a dynamic distributed infrastructure, support services, and technical expertise that enable researchers, engineers, and scholars to address the most important and challenging problems facing the nation and world.

Questions about the workshop can be sent to Mohamed Sayeed (msayeed@asu.edu) or Michael Bruck (mbruck@email.arizona.edu).

REGISTRATION:

You can Register here

*Note: You will have to first register as a new user on XSEDE portal in order to register for the event (if you do not already have an XSEDE account).

AGENDA:

Monday, March 31, 2014

9:00am Sign-In & Coffee
9:30am Welcome & Introductions – Heritage Room University Club
9:45am Keynote Speaker: Carlos Castillo-Chavez, Joaquin Bustoz Jr. Professor of Mathematical
Biology, and a Distinguished Sustainability Scientist, Arizona State University
10:30am Resource Provider Panel:

  • ASU Advanced Computing Center, Frank Timmes
  • University of Arizona Research Computing, Michael Bruck
  • XSEDE Overview, Scott Lathrop, Shodor
11:30am Research Talk: Michael Simeone, Director Institute of Humanities Research Nexus Laboratory for Digital Humanities and Transdisciplinary Informatics, Arizona State University
12:15pm Lunch* – Heritage Room University Club
1:15pm Research Talk: Omar Badreddin, Asst. Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northern Arizona University
Engineering Center Room 324 Business Admin. C Wing Room 9 Cowden Room 124
2:00pm-6:00pm Linux/Unix Basics for High Performance Computing – Jay Alameda, NCSA Computational Thinking: Introduction to Analytics, Modeling, Simulation, and Visualization in Teaching (2:00pm – 4:00pm) – Steve Gordon, OSC


Adding Computational Science to Curriculum (4:00pm – 6:00pm) – Steve Gordon, OSC
CUDATM: GPU Programming – Lars Koesterke, TACC

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

8:30am Sign-In & Coffee
Heritage Room University Club (Bring Your Own Laptop) Traditions Room University Club (Bring Your Own Laptop) Cowden Room 124
9:00am – 12:30pm Introduction to Parallel Computing with MPI and Open MP – Lars Koesterke, TACC Introduction to Humanities Computing with HPC including – Image Analytics, Video Analysis, Social Network Analysis, Visualization and Text Mining (9am – 10:30am) – Alan Craig, I-CHASS, UIUC


Scaling Your Research: Working with Population Data on Large Scale Systems (10:30am – noon) – Marshall Scott Pool, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
OpenACC: GPU Programming – Vince Betro, NICS
12:30pm Lunch*
Heritage Room University Club Traditions Room University Club Cowden Room 124
1:15pm Research Talk: Mitzi M. Montoya, Vice President and University Dean of Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Arizona State University Research Talk: Matei Georgescu, Senior Sustainability Scientist, Global Institute of Sustainability and Assistant Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University Research Talk: Banu Ozkan, Associate Professor Physics, Arizona State University
Heritage Room University Club (Bring Your Own Laptop) Traditions Room University Club (Bring Your Own Laptop) Cowden Room 124
2:00pm – 6:00pm XSEDE New User Training – Jay Alameda, NCSA Introduction to CyberGIS-based Spatial Data and Analytics (2pm – 4pm) – Yan Liu, NCSA


Humanities Research Projects Consulting (4pm – 6pm) – Alan Craig, I-CHASS, UIUC
Introduction to Scientific Visualization – Greg Abram, TACC

* Lunch and refreshments at breaks are provided.

ABSTRACTS:

Speaker: Through his position with the Shodor Education Foundation, Inc., Scott Lathrop splits his time between being the XSEDE Director of Education and Outreach, and being the Blue Waters Technical Program Manager for Education. Lathrop has been involved in high performance computing and communications activities since 1986. Lathrop coordinates education and outreach activities among the XSEDE Service Providers involved in the NSF funded XSEDE project. He coordinates undergraduate and graduate education activities for the Blue Waters project. Lathrop is project manager for a Department of Education Atlantis project in collaboration with the Cyprus Institute focused on engaging students, educators and researchers in computational science and high performance computing. Lathrop has been involved in the SC Conferences since 1989, has served as a member of the SC Steering Committee for more than six years, and was the SC11 General Conference Chair.
Abstract: An introduction to the Linux and Unix basics will be provided in this session. An overview of interacting with clusters and HPC resources will also be provided through interactive teaching. While there are no labs associated with this session, participants will be able to follow along with the instructor to gain experience and familiarity with the Linux/Unix environment.

Speaker: Jay Alameda is the lead for Advanced Application Support at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. In this role, he works with the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) which is a collaboration of NSF-funded high performance computing (HPC) resource providers, working to provide a common set of services, including the provisioning of advanced user support, to the science and engineering community. In particular, Jay leads the Extended Support for Training, Education, and Outreach Service of XSEDE, which provides the technical expertise to support Training, Education, and Outreach activities organized by XSEDE. Jay also works with the NSF-funded Track 1 project, Blue Waters, and in this role, has worked with advanced development tools (such as the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform) to support development and optimization of HPC applications on the Blue Waters resource. He is also leading the NSF funded SI2 project, “A Productive and Accessible Development Workbench for HPC Applications Using the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform”, which is working on a user- and application-centric plan to improve Eclipse PTP as a platform for development of HPC applications, with a particular focus on broadening support of a diverse range of HPC resources (especially across XSEDE) as well as undertaking a broad education, outreach and training agenda to increase the size of the community benefiting from the capabilities of Eclipse PTP.

Abstract: This session will provide example materials for basic computational science education, modeling, and computational thinking. Several different tools that can be used to introduce modeling concepts will be demonstrated along with sources of models and instructional modules that can be inserted into a wide range of courses. The session will review model computational science undergraduate programs and facilitate discussions of the paths to curriculum changes. This session will also present a showcase of how computational science transforms the education and research experience.

Speaker: Dr. Steven Gordon is the Senior Education Specialist at the Ohio Supercomputer Center and Professor Emeritus in City and Regional Planning at The Ohio State University. He has also served as the Interim Executive Director of OSC for three years and the Senior Director of Education and Client Services. Currently, Dr. Gordon is the lead for the education program of the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) program funded by the National Science Foundation and the manager of the Blue Waters Graduate Fellowship Program. At OSC, Dr. Gordon has led the efforts to start computational science education programs at a number of Ohio institutions. For the XSEDE project, he is working with universities nationwide to assist them in starting computational science education programs by providing program models, shared materials, and professional development activities for faculty. His academic research centers around water quality and watershed management issues as well as the application of modeling and simulation to environmental assessment, land use change, and the use of Geographic Information Systems.

Abstract: This training module is a beginners/intermediate course on programming NVIDIA GPUs with CUDA. After a short segment on why we are using accelerators in High Performance Computing and on accelerator hardware I will describe all pieces necessary to write a program in C and Fortran. The example will be a stencil update, which is simple enough to be written in a few lines of code. The specific code design will be guided by the hardware and I will put emphasis on motivating common design principles by the desire to write fast code for GPU accelerators. In the second part of the presentation I will focus on two common optimization strategies, namely the use of shared memory and data streams. Some experience with writing serial code in C or Fortran will be helpful to follow the examples.

Speaker: Lars Koesterke joined TACC in the fall of 2007. He is a member of the High Performance Computing (HPC) group, with emphasis on Performance, Evaluation and Optimization of parallel programs. His work focuses on optimization, parallel computing with OpenMP and MPI, and Fortran. In 2011 he started evaluating and using Intel’s Xeon Phi architecture. He received his Ph.D. in Astrophysics in 1993.

Abstract: An overview of a typical XSEDE high performance computing (HPC) resource and the user-environment will be provided in this session. There are no labs associated with this session. The topics that will be discussed are:

  • HPC System Overview
  • Theoretical Background
  • Parallel computing systems
  • Parallel programming models
  • MPI/OpenMP examples
  • HPC User-Environment

Speaker: Lars Koesterke joined TACC in the fall of 2007. He is a member of the High Performance Computing (HPC) group, with emphasis on Performance, Evaluation and Optimization of parallel programs. His work focuses on optimization, parallel computing with OpenMP and MPI, and Fortran. In 2011 he started evaluating and using Intel’s Xeon Phi architecture. He received his Ph.D. in Astrophysics in 1993.

Abstract: This course is an overview of how high performance computing can be used in humanities, arts, and social science. High performance computing is being applied in humanities, arts, and social science in a variety of areas including the analysis of large collections of text documents, video collections, and image databases. Additionally, high performance computing is used to analyze networks, including social networking data, geospatial data, population data, and much much more. This course will address what high performance computing is, different application areas in humanities, arts, and social science, logistics involved in using high performance computing, and several current XSEDE projects will be described. Ample time for questions and answers will be provided.

Speaker: Dr. Alan B. Craig is the Humanities Specialist for XSEDE. He has been involved in high performance computing at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications for nearly 30 years. The most recent 10 years, he has focused on HPC in humanities, arts, and social science. Additionally, he is the associate director for human-computer interaction at the Institutes for Computing in Humanities, arts, and Social Science. His own work has focused on making computers more accessible and useful to those who view the computer as a tool, rather than and end in itself. His most recent work has focused on virtual reality and augmented reality. He has written three books, numerous papers, and book chapters, and holds three patents.

Abstract: The presentation will discuss the nature of Computational Social Science and digital humanistic inquiry and the challenges they pose. An example of a large scale social science project dealing with population level data will be elaborated. Special requirements and challenges for working with large scale computing resources will be discussed, including scaling up to full population sizes.

Speaker: Marshall Scott Poole is a David and Margaret Romano Professorial Scholar, Professor in the Department of Communication, Senior Research Scientist at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and Director of I-CHASS: The Institute for Computing in the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. He received his Ph.D in 1980 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Scott has taught at the University of Illinois, the University of Minnesota, and Texas A&M University. His research interests include group and organizational communication, information systems, collaboration technologies, organizational innovation, and theory construction. He is the author of over 120 articles and book chapters. His articles have appeared in Communication Monographs, Human Communication Research, Quarterly Journal of Speech, Communication Research, Small Group Research Management Science, Organization Science, Information Systems Research, MIS Quarterly, and Academy of Management Review, among others. Scott has co-authored or edited ten books including Communication and Group Decision-Making, Theories of Small Groups: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Organizational Change and Innovation Processes: Theory and Methods for Research, and The Handbook of Organizational Change and Innovation. Scott has been named a Fellow of the International Communication Association, a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association, and is recipient of the Steven A. Chaffee Career Productivity Award from the International Communication Association. Current research interests include team behavior in massive multiplayer online games, structuring of communication and information technologies in groups, and the intersection of group and network theory in explaining large, dynamically changing groups and intergroup networks.

Abstract: This workshop is intended to give C and Fortran programmers a hands-on introduction to OpenACC programming. Attendees will leave with a working knowledge of how to write scalable codes using OpenACC.

Speaker: Dr. Vincent Charles Betro received his Ph.D. in Computational Engineering from the University of Tennessee SimCenter at Chattanooga in 2010, where he became research faculty and the STEM Outreach coordinator. Since 2012, he is a Computational Scientist at the University of Tennessee National Institute for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where he focuses his research on porting and optimizing applications for several accelerator architectures and developing Computational Fluid Dynamics codes for the Application Acceleration Center of Excellence. Additionally, due to his background as a middle and high school mathematics teacher and college mathematics and engineering instructor, Vince enjoys working with students in his community to broaden their understanding of and interest in STEM careers and is actively involved in leadership in the XSEDE User Engagement and Campus Champions programs.

Abstract: An introduction to XSEDE User Portal will be provided in this session. An overview of capabilities accessible through the portal will be demonstrated in an interactive session, with the participants able to follow along with their own portal account. Additionally, the basics of XSEDE resource architecture, covering compute, storage, and environment management, will be presented, which will motivate an introductory job submission tutorial component. Finally, the participants will be able to learn the basics of file transfer with Globus Online. While there are no labs associated with this session, participants will be able to follow along with the instructor to gain experience and familiarity with the XSEDE environment.

Speaker: Jay Alameda is the lead for Advanced Application Support at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. In this role, he works with the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) which is a collaboration of NSF-funded high performance computing (HPC) resource providers, working to provide a common set of services, including the provisioning of advanced user support, to the science and engineering community. In particular, Jay leads the Extended Support for Training, Education, and Outreach Service of XSEDE, which provides the technical expertise to support Training, Education, and Outreach activities organized by XSEDE. Jay also works with the NSF-funded Track 1 project, Blue Waters, and in this role, has worked with advanced development tools (such as the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform) to support development and optimization of HPC applications on the Blue Waters resource. He is also leading the NSF funded SI2 project, “A Productive and Accessible Development Workbench for HPC Applications Using the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform”, which is working on a user- and application-centric plan to improve Eclipse PTP as a platform for development of HPC applications, with a particular focus on broadening support of a diverse range of HPC resources (especially across XSEDE) as well as undertaking a broad education, outreach and training agenda to increase the size of the community benefiting from the capabilities of Eclipse PTP.

Abstract: CyberGIS – geographic information science and systems (GIS) based on advanced cyberinfrastructure (CI) – has emerged during the past several years as a vibrant interdisciplinary field. This training session will present, demonstrate, and provide hands-on experience on CyberGIS as an XSEDE science gateway for computing- and data-intensive geospatial problem solving. Data and computational challenges in geospatial problem-solving are illustrated and the CyberGIS approach to addressing these challenges by building a scalable and shared online CyberGIS environment and efficiently harnessing CI.

Speaker: Yan Liu is the technical coordinator of the CyberGIS Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his B.S. in Computer Science and M.E. in Computer Engineering from Wuhan University, China in 1995 and 1998, respectively. He received his M.S. of Computer Science from the University of Iowa in 2002. His research interests include high-performance and scalable heuristics for spatial optimization, and scientific computing. He has been a staff member of the science gateway program in the NSF Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE)/TeraGrid project (www.xsede.org) since 2007.

Abstract: This session will discuss the visualization systems available to Xsede users at the Texas Advanced Computing Center. This will include an overview of the hardware on-site, the services available for remote-access visualization, and the software available for scientific visualization, including Visit and Paraview. A hands-on training session for Paraview will be offered. Discussion of information visualization will also be included as interest indicates.

Speaker: Dr. Abram earned a PhD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Computer Science. He is a Research Engineer/Science Associate at the Texas Advanced Computing Center since 2009, working in the area of high performance and large scale scientific visualization. Prior to that, Dr. Abram was a Research Staff Member at the IBM TJ Watson Research Center, where he acted as an architect and developer of the IBM Visualization Data Explorer (OpenDX) system and developed systems for co- and in-situ processing on Blue Gene systems, remote and collaborative visualization, and distributed parallel and large-format rendering on clusters. He has over twenty refereed publications including ACM SIGGRAPH, IEEE Visualization, IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications and the Astrophysical Journal.

You can download the abstracts here

ABSTRACTS: Invited Research Talks

Abstract: The marriage of mathematics and epidemics has a distinguished history with a plethora of successes that go back to the work of Daniel Bernoulli (1700 – 1782), Nobel Laureate and physician Sir Ronald Ross (1911), and associates. Primarily physicians established the field of mathematical epidemiology in their attempts to diminish health disparities, the consequences of poverty and the lack of access to health services, at the population level and even higher levels of organization. The last four decades have seen tremendous advances in the fields of computational, mathematical and theoretical epidemiology and immunology and the study of their connections to public health policy and homeland security are now routine. Hence, it is not surprising to see computational challenges and opportunities arising from demands generated by the study disease dynamics over multiple time scales and levels of organization and from the search of response to questions of importance to the fields of public health, homeland security, immunology, epidemiology and evolutionary biology. In this lecture, I will revisit some of the history of the field and discuss recent applications involving the research of collaborators and former students; research where I have often played a minor role. The lecture will be directed to a general audience.

Speaker: Carlos Castillo-Chavez is a Regents Professor and a Joaquin Bustoz Jr. Professor of Mathematical Biology at Arizona State University. He has co-authored over 200 publications. Some of the recognitions for his work include: three White House Awards (1992,1997, and 2011), the American Mathematical Society Distinguished Public Service Award and the 2007 AAAS Mentor award. He is a fellow of the AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science), SIAM (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics), AMS (American Mathematical Society), ACE (American College of Epidemiology), honorary Professorships at Xi’an Jiatong University in China and Universidad de Belgrano in Argentina. Past appointments include a Stanislaw M. Ulam Distinguished Scholar at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a Cátedra Patrimonial at UNAM in México, and a Martin Luther King Jr. Professorship at MIT. He is a member of the Board of Higher Education at the National Academy of Sciences (2009-2016) and serves in President Barack Obama Committee on the National Medal of Science (2010-2015).

Abstract: This presentation will discuss a few use cases for humanities research using high performance computing. Considering both text and moving image media, we will discuss the specific needs of humanities research practices, contingencies of supercomputing infrastructure, and what the future of humanities supercomputing may hold given recent developments in research and support.

Speaker: Michael Simeone is the Director of the IHR Nexus Lab for Digital Humanities and Transdisciplinary Informatics at ASU. He is also affiliated with the Image and Spatial Data Analysis Division at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. His research includes cultural studies of science and technology, humanities visualization methods, the use of computer vision in the digital humanities, and data-driven collaborations that bridge environmental sciences and humanities. He received his PhD in English from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Abstract: Patients wait times at Emergency Departments are increasing in North America. Patients safety, particularly for cases that require timely care services, can be compromised. Hospitals still struggle to enforce simple guidelines, such as hands washing for care givers before and after patients encounters. Data entry is significant, and human error is not uncommon. 40% of nurses time is consumed by data entry and admin tasks; time not spent with patients. Under utilization of hospital resources are very high when compared to other industries. Most hospitals are unable to deal with unpredictable inflow of patients. These are just a handful of problems that healthcare institutions are struggling with everyday.

This talk demonstrates how existing technologies can be used in an innovative way to effectively be part of the solution. The talk address high performance healthcare, real time flow monitoring, compliance and governance in care institutions.

Speaker: Dr. Badreldin is an assistant professor at Electrical Engineering & Computer Science Department at Northern Arizona University. Badreldin has 10 years experience in Process Management and Business transformations in multiple industries, and has recently been working in healthcare informatics research.

Abstract:

Speaker: Mitzi M. Montoya is Vice President and University Dean for Entrepreneurship & Innovation at Arizona State University. She is also Chair of the Board of Directors for the Center for Entrepreneurship in the W.P. Carey School of Business. Dr. Montoya received her Ph.D. in Marketing and Statistics and a B.S. in Applied Engineering Science (General Engineering – Mechanical Systems), both from Michigan State University.

Dr. Montoya is responsible for advancing ASU as a leader in entrepreneurship and innovation and for strategic direction for ASU’s broad portfolio of entrepreneurial and innovative initiatives, including student and faculty entrepreneurship as well as advancement of the entrepreneurial ecosystem. Previously at ASU, Dr. Montoya served as Dean of the College of Technology & Innovation and Vice Provost of the ASU Polytechnic campus. She led the development of a new model for higher education that embedded hands-on, real-world projects in the curriculum in partnership with industry and the community. Dr. Montoya established ASU as a national leader in the growing maker movement and developed innovative partnerships to advance higher education, including a partnership with TechShop, which was the first partnership of its kind in the world, uniting a public open prototyping facility with higher education curriculum. Prior to joining ASU, Dr. Montoya was held the Zelnak chair in Marketing & Innovation in the Poole College of Management at North Carolina State University where she founded and led the university-wide Innovation Lab.

Dr. Montoya has taught graduate and undergraduate courses in technological entrepreneurship and innovation. She has delivered courses on these topics in the US, England, Brazil, Italy, Egypt, Kuwait, Russia, Japan, Switzerland, Panama and Argentina. Her publications have appeared in Management Science, the Journal of Marketing Research, Marketing Science, the Academy of Management Journal, the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Decision Sciences, MIS Quarterly, the Journal of Product Innovation Management, among others. She currently leads ASU’s USAID sponsored program on Vocational Training and Education for Clean Energy

Dr. Montoya serves on the board of several startup ventures and has advised many organizations on topics related to innovation strategy. Her consulting experience includes work with organizations such as Center for Creative Leadership, EDUCAUSE, Xerox, Dow Chemical Company, IBM, Mead Westvaco, Glaxo Smith Kline, Eli Lilly, Raytheon, Martin Marietta Materials, Daimler Chrysler, Cotton Incorporated, Koch/INVISTA, among others.

Abstract: Sustainable development requires incorporation of strategies focused on both greenhouse gas emissions and direct effects associated with landscape modification. Undeniably sustainable development paths require solutions aimed at overcoming challenges vis-à-vis the linked climate–energy–water nexus. In this talk, Matei Georgescu will discuss how he and his colleagues utilize computational modeling to address current and future sustainability challenges. Specific examples will focus on urban-induced landscape change, urban energy demand, and biofuels expansion; all research instances of immediate practical domestic and international concern.

Speaker: Dr. Georgescu is a Senior Sustainability Scientist for Global Institute of Sustainability, Assistant Professor in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Arizona State University. His research aims to improve understanding and characterization of distinct phenomena related to urbanization-induced landscape change. He focuses on identifying hydro-climatic and air quality impacts resulting from large-scale urbanization, as well as potential adaptation and mitigation strategies. In addition, Dr. Georgescu addresses environmental consequences of renewable energy expansion by integrating across physical, agricultural, and socio-economic elements.

Abstract: Proteins are the biological workhorses that carry out a tremendous variety of functions in every cell. They support the skeleton, control senses, move muscles, digest food, defend against infections, and process emotions. To carry out their crucial tasks, proteins must fold into a complex unique three-dimensional structure called native structure. If they misfold, it leads to critical diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s etc. The biggest unsolved question is: what tells a protein to turn into a unique 3-D shape and how does it achieve this? In this talk, we present a physics based approach to answer this question and give insight about the sequence- structure and function relationship. Moreover, we will give insight mechanisms the in protein evolution in altering the function.

Speaker: Dr. S. Banu Ozkan completed her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the Bogazici University in Turkey wit, continued her postdoctoral research at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School and later worked as a fellow in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of California, San Francisco. Currently, she is an Associate Professor in the Department of Physics at ASU. She has developed a broad range of methods, including modified versions of elastic network methods, and all-atom physics-based computer simulations to understand the physical principles of bio-molecular interactions at different length and time scales. As a trained theoretician, she believes her role is to provide guidance and assistance to experimentalists with
whom she collaborates to develop hypothesis-driven science in biological physics. Therefore, a key aspect in all her work has been to have a close connection with experimentalists in order to understand the otherwise puzzling data on biological systems. Dr. Ozkan is a member of the Center for Biological Physics and the Center for Evolutionary Medicine & Informatics at ASU and her main goal is to provide structural insights to genomics and disease-associated mutations. She also works modeling membrane proteins for the Center for Membrane Proteins in Infectious Diseases and organized a meeting on protein folding in 2010 at ASU.

You can download the Invited Research Talks here

VENUE, PARKING, & DIRECTIONS:

Venue:
University Club
425 East University Dr
Tempe, AZ 85281


Parking:
30 parking spots have been reserved for non-ASU attendees at the University Club parking lot and are available first come, first served. Additional visitor parking is available at the Fulton Center located across the street from the University Club off of University and College Avenues. There are parking fees associated with this garage.
Directions:

Directions from Loop 202 map:

  • Exit off Scottsdale Rd/Rural Rd going south
  • Turn Right on University Dr.
  • Take the first left after Palm Walk
  • Go straight until you reach our parking lot

Directions form Interstate 60 map:

  • Exit Rural Rd and go north
  • Turn Left on University Dr.
  • Take the first left after Palm Walk
  • Go straight until you reach our parking

ASU Tempe Campus interactive map: http://www.asu.edu/map/interactive/

Map


A2C2 NIGHT OF THE OPEN DOOR EVENT – March 1, 2014

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Researchers use computers in their work every day, but often the problems they are trying to solve are so big that one computer simply cannot handle the task. By harnessing the power of thousands of computers that are communicating with each other simultaneously, a big problem can be divided and conquered. Sounds simple enough, but coordinating all of these computers requires a special kind of expertise. Members of the community are invited to come learn more about high performance computing via an interactive tour of the ASU Advanced Computing Center’s facilities. Through this event, you will have the opportunity to walk into a modern supercomputer data center and explore some of the areas researchers are investigating with this powerful tool.

In addition, this year we will feature members of our ASU Sun Devils Cluster Challenge Team showing off and demonstrating the unique cluster that they built for the Supercomputing 2013 conference. Our team entered the “commodity track” at SC13, where spending is limited to $2,500 retail price to build a complete cluster with a total energy draw that cannot exceed 15 amps. Their cluster won first place for the lowest cost per FLOP award (i.e., the greenest computing) at $4.96 per gigaFLOP. Tours will run every 30 minutes starting at 4 p.m. and with last tour starting at 8:30 p.m. All are welcome to attend!

Link: here


Spring 2013 A2C2 and Intel Advanced Computing Workshop – March 12, 2013

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On Tuesday, March 12, 2013, A2C2 and Intel will co-sponsor an Advanced Computing training event for members of the A2C2 user community and the public – all are welcome to attend!

Highlights of the event will include an introductory discussion on technology directions being pursued by Intel, brief presentations by local ASU researchers, and advanced computing sessions for new and experienced users of A2C2′s resources facilitated by Intel and local HPC experts. The training event will close with a Q&A opportunity for A2C2 users.

In addition, a senior level engineer from Intel will be present to recruit upcoming ASU graduates with skills in high performance computing throughout the event. Intel Corporation is developing compute and fabric products for Exascale class HPC systems. The Intel Xeon Phi Product Family brings breakthrough parallel computing performance to scientific applications. In addition, Intel is also developing new, innovative HPC fabrics to deliver unprecedent high bandwidth/low latency communication capabilities for Exascale systems. show more

The Fabric Development Organization (FDO) within Intel Corporations Technical Computing Group is hiring multiple full time positions in the areas of HW design, validation, prototyping, SW development, performance analysis and modeling. The selected candidates will help FDO develop a state-of-the-art fabric technology for Exascale class scientific applications. We invite BS/MS/PhD students in the areas of Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering or Computer Science to apply at the A2C2 + Intel Computing Workshop.

Stop by and introduce yourself – don’t forget your resume!

This is a free event. However, attendees are respectfully asked to RSVP below. Please direct inquiries to a2c2@asu.edu.

Details:


A2C2 NIGHT OF THE OPEN DOOR EVENT – March 2, 2013

After great success at last year’s event, ASU will be holding our second annual Night of the Open Door event on March 2, 2013. The Night of the Open Door is a SciTech Festival signature event in which the University will open its doors to the community, presenting the ultimate open house! ASU will welcome families with children of all ages, potential students, teachers, alumni, and community members to visit our campus. A corridor on ASU Tempe’s campus will be lit up and visitors will be provided with a map and list of activities to participate in, including tours, exhibits and workshops.
As part of our commitment to outreach and education, A2C2 is excited to participate in this wonderful event. A2C2 will hold an open house on Saturday, March 2, 2013 for members of the community wishing to learn more about high performance computing. A2C2 is located on the first floor of the Goldwater Center and tours will be given between 5 Pm and 9 PM, every half hour. Please mark your calendars and join us for this exciting event!
For more information about our evening program, please visit: https://opendoor.asu.edu/mysteries-supercomputing-revealed-meet-asus-fastest-and-most-powerful-computer.

ASU’s Night of the Open Door Event – 2012

ASU is one of the founding partners of the Arizona SciTech Festival and it is only fitting that we sponsor an event. The Night of the Open Door is a SciTech Festival signature event in which the University will open its doors to the community on the weekend of March 3rd. This event will be the ultimate open house, welcoming families with children of all ages, potential students, teachers, alumni, and community members to visit our campus. A corridor on ASU Tempe’s campus will be lit up and visitors will be provided with a map and list of activities to participate in, including tours, exhibits and
workshops.
As part of our commitment to outreach and education, A2C2 is excited to participate in this wonderful event. A2C2 will hold an open house on Saturday, March 3, 2012 for members of the community wishing to learn more about high performance computing. A2C2 is located on the first floor of the Goldwater Center and tours will be given between 5 Pm and 9 PM, every half hour. Please mark your calendars and join us for this exciting event!

A2C2 and IBM Co-Host Special High Performance Computing Event – 2011

A2C2 is excited to invite you to attend a very special event featuring the IBM high performance computing (HPC) team and special guest, the IBM Watson computing system recently featured on the game show Jeopardy! The event will be held on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 in ASU’s Memorial Union Turquoise Ballroom and is open to ASU’s faculty, staff and students, as well as Northern Arizona University, University of Arizona, Arizona’s local community colleges and A2C2’s partner organizations, TGen, the Arizona Science Center and more. In addition to guest speakers and presentations from the IBM high performance computing team, this action packed event will feature research presentations from the ASU community, and of course an interactive display of Watson’s capabilities!
Our special event will close with a poster presentation featuring research from the ASU community and an informal “meet and greet,” giving attendees an opportunity to learn more about ASU community research interests, IBM high performance computing, A2C2’s services and facilities, and IBM Watson.
The program of events for Wednesday, September 14, 2011 can be found here.